Category Archives: Technology

5 Qualities of a Good Special Education Advocate

Are you the parent of a child with autism that is having a dispute with school personnel, and would like some help? Are you the parent of a child with a learning disability, or another type of disability, that could use an advocate to help you in getting an appropriate education for your child? This article will give you 5 qualities that make a good special education advocate

An advocate is a person that has received special training, that helps parents navigate the special education system. In some cases the advocate is a parent of a child themselves, but this is not always the case. Before you hire an advocate check on their experience, and also make sure that the advocate is familiar with your child’s disability, so that they are able to advocate effectively

Qualities:

1 A good advocate must be familiar with the federal and state education laws that apply to special education, and be willing to use them, when needed. This is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), State rules for special education (how they will comply with IDEA), and No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). The advocate does not have to memorize the laws, but should have a basic knowledge of what is in them. The advocate must also be willing to bring up the laws, at IEP meetings, if this will benefit the child.

2. A good advocate should not make false promises to parents. If an advocate tells you. that they will get the services that you want for your child, be leery! Unfortunately, there are no guarantees in special education, and advocates should not promise things that they may not be able to get. An experienced advocate who knows the law and your school district, should have a sense about what can be accomplished.

3. A good advocate should be passionate about your child, and the educational services that they need. Advocacy sometimes takes a lot of time. If the person helping you is not passionate about your child, they may not be willing to help you for the length of time that it takes to get your child an appropriate education.

4. A good advocate must be willing to stand up to special education personnel, when they disagree with them, or when the school personnel tell a lie. If the advocate you pick, has every quality, but is not willing to stand up to school personnel, he or she will not be an effective advocate for your child.

5. A good advocate is detail oriented, and makes sure that any services promised by special education personnel, are put in writing. A good advocate will read the IEP before they leave the meeting, and bring up any changes that should be made. Sometimes the little details are what makes for success!

By keeping in mind these 5 qualities, you will be better equipped to finding an advocate that will be able to help you, get an appropriate education for your child.

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What Is the Relationship Between My Education and Oppression Today?

The expression of education and oppression in today’s modern society can be traced to the very premise upon which the institutions of education are predicated. Theologian Cardinal Newman’s views[1] on education shed light on this meaning, “This implies that its object is, on the one hand, intellectual not moral; and on the other, that is the diffusion and extension of knowledge rather than the advancement (p. 122)”. Here we find the very idea of my own journey into higher education specifically in the context of my Catholic faith. The numerous sources described various situations were ideological choices of purpose are bestowed upon the students. In one case the affluent student must continue the rise of his family honor and in the next case the poor student seeks “liberation” (p. 124).

My own story is one of seeking liberation from a “historically oppressed minority” (p. 126). Choosing this type of Catholic education at Creighton resonates with me. The correlation of stagnancy and ignorance to lack of education seem very real as I am sure is does to the Native Americans in Pine Ridge and Rosebud Lakota (p. 133). Creighton University has taught me that through upright character and the art of Christian living (pp. 128-129) that action follows faith. Theologian Michael J. Buckley, S.J. captured this idea with, “a new orientation towards social action and efficacy and a conjunction between literary education and moral and religious formation” (p. 128).

In today’s world of mammon allowing for access to education, I would not have chosen this path if not for my inherent knowledge that my whole person will be evaluated in the context of my community. The pathway forward out of oppression for me is to serve the greater good. This includes my family and the community of like-minded people working for God’s glory. It is this type of education even in this online format that makes the end goal of being a “better human being” (p. 130) possible.

Lack of Education Contributes to Crime

As more and more low-income families move into neighborhoods that once catered to the middle or upper class, one must be on the lookout for his own personal safety and report any criminal activity going on in their surroundings. Crime is everywhere in these neighborhoods where kids find too much time on their hands after school hours or after the school year lets out.

What also contributes to the crime rate in such places? Is it just the lack of money for low income families? Sometimes, crime can be attributed to the lack of education on the part of the perpetrator or their families.

It is a statistical fact that the crime rate is inversely proportional to the education level of the culprit. Kids who grow up in families that do not stress the importance of getting an education are more likely to be living out on the streets, doing drugs, joining gangs, or ending up in prison.

Sometimes parents who raise such kids were raised in similar conditions when they were youngsters. Nothing has changed. An education should be foremost on parents’ minds when rearing their kids. In fact, an education is the key out of poverty. As the old saying goes, “The way out of the gutter is with a book and not a basketball.”

Kids who do not have a good education in school are more likely to have difficulty with finding jobs, getting into college, or staying out of trouble with the law. Many times they have family issues that are attributed to the loss of a parent at a young age due to a death or an incarceration.

Kids from single-parent homes run that risk of growing up as an “at-risk” child. This is due to the fact that the parent must work to provide food and shelter for the child, and the absence of the other parent fails to provide leadership and guidance for a growing mind. A parent who is incarcerated will definitely not be around to guide the child to getting good grades in school.

What kind of message does an incarcerated parent send to a child? Is it okay to be dumb and stupid and end up in prison like their daddy? Like father, like son. Right? Is it okay to skip school and join a gang like their daddy once did?

The truth of the matter is that kids who drop out of school will face hardship in their lives as they grow older. Lack of education on their part means lack of money to support a family. Lack of money translates into robbing a bank or convenience store.

We hear in the news every day a robbery that occurs in our city or elsewhere. Or perhaps a shooting on the part of the perpetrator that caused an innocent life come to an abrupt halt.

What are kids doing nowadays? How can we prevent our own kids from becoming troubled kids? For one, a parent must be a good role model and stress the importance of a good education. That means the parents must take an active role in their child’s education by monitoring how much television the child is allowed to watch and taking charge of knowing the kinds of friends that his child associates with. Furthermore, this means maintaining communication with his teachers at school and looking over his report card regularly.

A child with poor academic performance may indicate something wrong at school. Perhaps he does not like school due to external influences; i.e. bullying, difficult teachers, taunting by other students, or peer pressure.

It is better to catch the child’s problem as early as possible before it comes to the point that the child is truant from school, or worse, acts out his frustration that is reflected in another Virginia Tech-like massacre.

A child should like his studies and should show interest in his schoolwork. He should be taught that good grades will help him get a good education so that he can get a good paying job and be a productive member of society after he graduates.

Teach your child that involvement in gangs, violence, drugs, and/or extortion will not get him anywhere but prison. Once a person ends up doing life in prison, there IS no second chance. There is no freedom for him. There is no TV, no video games, no music, nothing! Not even a chance to get an education behind bars. If there is school in prison, the education is very limited.

If you are raising a child, question your child as to what is going on in school if he/she displays academic difficulty. Spend some quality time with him/her. Help them with their homework if possible. Remember, you are not just his/her friend, you are their parents. You are the first role model that a child looks toward from infancy. So be a good one and teach him/her what is right by staying in school.

There is a story in Austin, Texas a few years ago. It involved a troubled 17-year-old kid, Manuel Cortez, a high school dropout, who went out with his friends in a stolen car one sunny afternoon, and shot another student, Christopher Briseno, whom he did not even know because Briseno allegedly was teasing the sister of Manuel’s friend. Manuel Cortez is now serving life in prison because he made a stupid decision. Now families of the victim and the perpetrator are suffering two losses from society. All for what? Because Mr. Cortez chose to drop out of school and associate with gangs and/or violence? He chose to give up the possibility of an education so that he can run around gang banging? Or did he not have the proper support and guidance from his parents?

Special Education and the Importance of Collaboration

Collaboration means working with an individual or a group of individuals to achieve a common goal. Its importance is most visible in education. Every day, teachers work together with their peers, school counselors, and other staff for the success of each student. And when it comes to special education, collaboration becomes the single most important thing for a teacher.

A teacher for special education has to collaborate with school administrators, general education teachers, school therapists, psychologists, and parents and guardians. Students with mild disability have now been included in regular classroom teaching, according to the provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education (IDEA) Act. This has led to general and special education teachers working together, often with the help of the best fun educational apps. The role of the educator in a general classroom, involves teaching the curriculum and assessing and evaluating special children. It’s important that a the educator brings in a set of personal skills to enhance student learning. Skills of both the general teacher and the special educator should come together to help a student.

A special educator has to work closely with the school management. It’s a vital part of the job. Working with the management will help the special teacher follow the necessary laws and procedure, work with individualized education plan (IEP), and make sure that special children are accommodated in the appropriate classroom. It’s always important to forge a strong relationship with these people for ensuring the success of a special student.

Working with parents is a major challenge for all special education teachers. It’s important to make strong and regular contact. It’s a nice idea to allow parents come and volunteer in the classroom, so that both the educator and the parent can help the children. A special child can obviously relate more to a parent. If parents explain the use of the best fun educational apps for kids, it’s likely to be more believable to the children.

Working with school therapists and psychologists is another key collaboration of a special educator. A therapist can inform the educator about the limitations of a special child. He/she may even recommend the best fun educational apps for kids so that special children pick up social skills faster. The educator, on his/her part, can update the therapist on how a child is progressing. The therapist is also responsible for diagnosis of a special child.

The work of the school psychologist is also largely similar. They too test children for disabilities and ensure that the IEP is being properly followed.

Collaboration is an important part of a special educator’s job, regardless of which part of school education he/she is involved with. Whether it’s working with the school administration, other teachers, parents, guardians, counselors, or therapists, a special educator has to work as part of a team for the betterment of special children. The needs of a special child are much different from that of a neuro-typical. Besides, each child is different. The best fun educational apps can keep the child engaged besides imparting important social skills.

Over-Identification of Minority Children in Special Education – What Can Be Done?

Are you concerned about the amount of minority children that are being diagnosed with disabilities in your school district? Are you worried about the large numbers of African American boys receiving special education services? Are you concerned about your child who is in a minority group and being found eligible for special education! Much has been written in the past several years about the increased numbers of poor African-American children receiving special education services. This article will discuss this issue, and also underlying causes of this.

In 1975 when the Education for All Handicapped Children Act was passed Congress found that poor African-American children were being placed in special education much more often than other children. These difficulties continue today. In the Findings section of IDEA 2004 Congress stated about the ongoing problems with the over-identification of minority children including mislabeling the children and high drop out rates.

About 9% of all school age children are diagnosed with a disability and receive special education services. But African-American children receive special education services at a rate about 40% higher than the national average across racial and ethnic groups at about 12.4%. Studies have shown that schools that have mostly white students and teachers, place a disproportionately high number of minority children in special education.

Also, rates of mental retardation and emotional/behavioral disturbance are extremely elevated within the African-American population, roughly twice the national average. Within the African-American population the incidence of mental retardation is approximately 220% higher than other ethnic groups. For emotional/behavioral disturbance the incidence is approximately 175% higher than other ethnic groups.

Factors that may contribute to disabilities include:

1. Health issues like prenatal care, access to medical care, child nutrition, and possible exposure to lead and other pollutants.

2. Lack of access to good quality medical care as well as services for any mental health disorders.

3. Cultural issues and values or stigma attached to disability

4. Discrimination along the lines of class and race!

5. Misdiagnosis of the child’s behavioral and academic difficulty.

A few ideas that could help decrease the over identification:

1. Better keeping of data to include increased information about race, gender, and race by gender categories. More detailed, systematic, and comprehensive data collections would provide a better sense of demographic representation in special education that could better help understand this issue.

2. More analytic research is needed to improve our understanding of the numerous factors that independently or in combination contribute to a disability diagnosis.

3. More people that are willing to help advocate for children in this situation. I believe that some of this issue, is related to the inability of some special education personnel to understand cultural differences.

4. Better and clearer guidelines for diagnosing disabilities that could reduce the potential for subjective judgments that are often cited for certain diagnosis.

5. More improvements are needed in general education to help children learn to read and keep up with their grade and age appropriate peers.

I hope over time this issue will get resolved so that all children receive an appropriate education.

Robert Kiyosaki Says There Are 3 Types of Education For Financial Success

According to Robert Kiyosaki, there are 3 types of education that are key to financial success in life.

-Scholastic education: This education teaches us to read, write and do math. This education is very important in today’s world.

-Professional education: This education teaches you how to work for money and if your smart get a job as a doctor, lawyer, accountant or other professional trades such as plumbers, builders, auto mechanics and electricians. The country is full of school that will give you this education to help you become more employable.

-Financial education: This is the education where you learn to have money work for you rather than you work for money. This education is not taught in most of our schools.

So many of our parents taught us the “Poor Dad” mentality where we had to get our education to go and work for someone else. Well, with the economy as it is right now, it is less stable having a corporate job than a work at home job. But as Kiyosaki’s “Rich Dad” taught him, “If you have a poor financial education, you will always work for the rich.”

I don’t know about you, but I am psychologically unemployable having gained the knowledge of a financial education through my Wealth Masters International system. I am no longer employable to work for money. I need to work for myself and have my money working for me. Nothing else makes sense, not even if I was broke would I go back to work for a paycheck. When there are opportunities on the internet where you can work form home and spend less time and create a profit rather than a wage the sky is the limit.

I came to realize that the direct sales system is a way for anyone to acquire great wealth. The system is open to anyone who has drive, determination and perseverance. Or as I also like to categorize it, the correct Mindset, Marketing and Mission. It doesn’t matter your age, gender, race, or popularity. The direct sales industry is about how much you are willing to learn, share and grow.

My experience with direct sale and network marketing is that people are very willing to share their newly acquired systems to make money. They become teachers of their trade and give back to the economy in a positive manner.

So let us all share what we have learned for ourselves about financial education so we can all create wealth and not work for the rich man any longer.

Listing Education on a Resume

So you’ve gone to the time, expense and effort to complete some aspect of formal education. Or maybe you started to work on this, but then inevitably, life happened… had to take a job to pay the bills, got married, had kids, moved, etc. etc. There’s a universe of things that life can throw at you that can interrupt even the most well-intentioned plans for education.

There are some rules of thumb out there when listing education on a resume which should be considered.

1. DON’T list the year you graduated. Unless you are in an education, government, scientific or highly technical field where having a date of graduation is essential, please don’t broadcast how old you are by including this information. (Human resource managers do the math!) Sure, if you are an adult learner who just got done with a degree, it’s new and important to you just like it is to a person fresh out of high school who immediately went to college. However, resist the temptation to perhaps look younger by listing the graduation date!

With the exception of the four fields mentioned above, the cold, hard truth about education is this:

Most employers really only care whether you graduated… Yes or No.

They don’t care what your GPA was, how many times you made it to the Dean’s list, what scholarships you landed, and sure, you can list that you graduated as magna cum laude or summa cum laude… but that often isn’t a deciding factor as to whether or not to hire you- it just becomes distracting with all of the scholarships, awards, grade points, etc. Keep it clean and simple.

2. A common mistake recent graduates also make is that they want to list their education FRONT AND CENTER… naturally because this is generally the MOST IMPORTANT THING the person has ever done in their lives to date. However, most human resource managers are really probing for what kinds of experience that the person has, not their education. So the best advice is to put the education later in the résumé rather than near the beginning.

3. DO list all of your education. Some people in this economy are becoming sensitive about feeling ‘over-qualified’ or ‘over-educated.’ Think of it this way- employers are in the catbird seat right now… they can afford to hire workers that they couldn’t dream of hiring just five years ago. So they are ‘cherry-picking’ the top candidates and if they can find a top leader in a field who is willing to come work for them, they’ll gladly take them. Who wouldn’t?

Additionally, if you didn’t complete a degree, you can indicate: “Program coursework in: (area of study).

Give yourself credit for the time you’ve put into it, even if the end result isn’t what you had hoped for. It shows initiative and a desire to improve your knowledge and skills.

I’ve had a few clients that I’ve worked with who had put down a degree name on their résumé, but it turned out that during our consultation, that, well, they never ever REALLY ended up finishing their degree.

This kind of misrepresentation is one of the oldest tricks in the job search book… if this sounds like you, it would be in your best interest to be as forthright as possible about your educational background. Human resource managers are well aware of this trick!!! Quite honestly, the EASIEST background check to do in the world is to verify whether a person graduated or not from a particular institution. Fudging it or trying to convey a different impression is a fast-track to the trashbin for your résumé.

So this is an ‘either’ or an ‘or’ situation.

EITHER you got the degree OR you took program coursework in a field.

If you are currently in progress, you can indicate:

Degree name (spelled out, please): area of study (anticipated completion date: ______)

As for the rest of your education, anything else that is not from a formal, accedited institution or career school falls into the ‘professional development’ category, and can include everything from industry certifications, workshops, trainings, continuing education units (CEUs), conferences, seminars, conventions and the like.

You’ll want to call this specific section “Professional Development,” which conveys to an employer that you are always actively taking steps to improve and hone your skills so you can do your job better.

Not working right now? Have some resources? Try keeping up on industry trends by registering for a class in your field through a trade association. It’s a great way to keep your ‘toe in the pool’ and stay current.

Keeping your mind engaged while looking for employment is very important. Sometimes, being laid off is the very opportunity needed to open a new chapter for professional enhancement… there simply wasn’t time for it previously. You never know where this can lead to! A recent client of mine spent the money to get certified with another industry credential. One of the requirements of the certification was to take an exam. When she showed up at the exam location, she found out that she was the only unemployed person there- everyone else was there through their company. The amazing thing was that she got three highly-qualified job leads by talking to the people there at the exam location… and she was so thrilled that the exam itself wasn’t the highlight of the day!

Tips to Help Starting CFD Trading

Learning to trade DMA CFDs is often quite daunting at first, with new traders having to master the trading platforms offered by their DMA CFD providers and of course developing trading plans. Trading can be fun and rewarding if you take the time at the start to do your homework, below are a few important tips to help beginner traders get started.

1. Develop a trading plan

A common mistake new trader’s make is that they use an inappropriate
trading strategy, or worse still, they have got no plan at all.
Adopting a trading strategy and using it on a consistent basis, provides
a framework of discipline. It is also likely that this is going to
deliver better results than a hap-hazard approach or using a frequently
changing number of approaches. Care should be taken when deciding on a
strategy. It would be a mistake to attempt trading a technique dependent
on five-minute charts if you’re unable to access your trading platform
for much of the trading day. Likewise, it would be a mistake to use a
strategy based on monthly charts if your trading horizon is calculated
in days or weeks.

Certain traders tend to believe that a more
complex system is usually a better system. They build techniques that
employ huge numbers of inputs and require tremendously complex
calculations and algorithms. They regularly produce graphs which are so
heavily covered in indicators that it becomes difficult to spot the
price action. While a few of these complicated systems certainly are
effective, the greater the number of inputs and calculations they need,
the more potential there is for something to go wrong. In some ways, a
simple approach is usually superior (and easier to stick to with
confidence) than a more complicated approach.

One of many
strategies employed by a lot of traders is the short trade. This is
where a trader sells a CFD that they don’t currently hold in
anticipation of buying it back again at a cheaper price in the future.
While it can be argued that there is no difference between taking a long
position or a short position, a short position might not be suitable
for a conservative trader. In theory, a short position holds much
greater risk than a long position, this is because of the difference in
the maximum possible downside for each type of trade. When holding a
long CFD position, the worst possible move could be for the CFD to fall
to zero and become worthless. For a short position, where losses will
mount as prices rise, the maximum loss is limitless. While holding a
short CFD position over an equity with a skyrocketing price is unlikely,
it is possible. It would be a mistake for a very conservative trader to
trade on the short side, especially without a stop-loss order in place.

2. Learn how to use your trading platform

It can sometimes be a steep learning curve when trading on a new
platform however once you have spent the time and effort and overcome
any lingering fears of technology you’ll realise that this is important
if you are to be a successful online trader. It is no good waiting until
you have open positions and the markets start moving before you
determine how to put on or alter a stop-loss or take-profit order. You
must ‘know’ how to manoeuvre around the platform and open, close or
adjust orders without needing to look up the platform user guide.

You
also need to plan for more extreme situations. Think about what might
occur if your internet connection were to break down or if your PC
became infected with a virus and wasn’t operating at its peak. As a
preventive measure, it is wise to write down your CFD provider’s
telephone number near your PC. Additionally it is good practice to keep a
list of your open positions so that you know what your exposure is.

3. Take accountability for your trades

Most traders closely keep an eye on their open positions but there
are those that make the mistake of not doing so. By frequently checking
on your open positions you’ll know what your overall exposure to the
market is and whether or not you’re in profit or loss situation.

As
well as trading mistakes, some traders simply forget that they have
placed certain orders, or because they do not understand the platform
they find that they have by accident placed orders without meaning to do
so. It’s best to discover these errors as fast as possible by keeping
track of your open positions. Mistakes made when entering trades tend to
be more frequent than you might think. Traders frequently hit buy
instead of sell (or vice versa) or enter the incorrect quantity or even
the wrong ticker symbol. These are simple errors that tend to be put
down to having a “fat finger”. However, if you take your trading
seriously, you need to make sure that you exercise the proper amount of
care.

CFD Trading can easily be very rewarding and enjoyable if
you spend some time at the start educating yourself and learning the
tools of your trade. Naturally it is always important to keep in mind
that trading DMA CFDs can be risky, however the tips outlined above will
assist you in managing risk and will help you to avoid many of the
mistakes traders make when starting out.

Technology Benefit Young Children’s Education

As parents, we have all been at war with our children because they have been absorbed into video games or movies on iPad, tablets or smartphones. We have a better chance of getting Tom Cruise’s attention walking on the red carpet than our children.

Today, it’s common for two-year-olds to be using iPads, elementary schoolers hooked up to video games, and we all suffer (or live with) the challenge of prying your middle-schooler away from the computer long enough to eat a decent meal.

Technology is everywhere and its draw on kids is obvious, but is technology helping our kids learn? Technology is becoming more social, adaptive, and customized, and as a result, it can be a fantastic teaching tool. That stated, as parents, we need to establish boundaries.

Today, software is connecting
kids to online learning communities, tracking kids’ progress through
lessons and games, and customizing each students’ experience.

By the time your child is in elementary school, they will probably well-versed in technology.

Learning with Technology at School

Schools are investing more and more in technology. Whether your
child’s class uses an interactive Smartboard, laptops, or another
device, here are three ways to make sure that technology is used
effectively.

Young children love playing with technology, from
iPads to digital cameras. What do early childhood practitioners – and
parents, too – need to think about before handing kids these gadgets?

Let’s start at the beginning: what is technology in early childhood?

Technology can be as simple as a camera, audio recorder, music
player, TV, DVD player, or more recent technology like iPads, tablets,
and smartphones used in child care centers, classrooms, or at home.

More
than once, I’ve had teachers tell me, “I don’t do technology.” I ask
them if they’ve ever taken a digital photo of their students, played a
record, tape, or DVD, or give kids headphones to listen to a story.

Teachers
have always used technology. The difference is that now teachers are
using really powerful tools like iPads and iPhones in their personal and
professional lives.

Technology is just a tool.

It shouldn’t be used in classrooms or child care centers because
it’s cool, but because teachers can do activities that support the
healthy development of children.

Teachers are using digital
cameras – a less flashy technology than iPads – in really creative ways
to engage children in learning. That may be all they need.

At the
same time, teachers need to be able to integrate technology into the
classroom or child care center as a social justice matter.

We can’t assume that all children have technology at home.

A
lack of exposure could widen the digital divide – that is, the gap
between those with and without access to digital technology – and limit
some children’s school readiness and early success.

Just as all
children need to learn how to handle a book in early literacy, they need
to be taught how to use technology, including how to open it, how it
works, and how to take care of it.

Experts worry that technology is bad for children.

There
are serious concerns about children spending too much time in front of
screens, especially given the many screens in children’s lives.

Today,
very young children are sitting in front of TVs, playing on iPads and
iPhones, and watching their parents take photos on a digital camera,
which has its own screen.

There used to be only the TV screen.

That was the screen we worried about and researched for 30 years.

We
as a field know a whole lot about the impact of TV on children’s
behavior and learning, but we know very little about all the new digital
devices.

The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages screen
time for children under two years old, but the NAEYC/Fred Rogers
position statement takes a slightly different stance.

It says that technology and media should be limited, but what matters most is how it is used.

What is the content?

Is it being used in an intentional manner?

Is it developmentally appropriate?

As
parents, we need to be aware of the drawbacks of technology and its
impact on eyesight, vocabulary and physical development. We also need to
be cognizant of our kids overall development,

My advice to
teachers and parents is to trust your instincts. You know your child and
if you think they have been watching the screen too long, turn it off.

It’s
up to us, as parents, to notice that your child’s computer time is
reducing or limiting interactions and playtime with other kids and nudge
them in new directions. To encourage them to be physically active, to
get outside and play.

It’s also up to the adult to understand the
child’s personality and disposition and to figure out if a technology is
one of the ways the child chooses to interact with the world.

At the same time, cut yourself some slack.

We
all know that there are better things to do with children’s time than
to plop them in front of a TV, but we also know that child care
providers have to make lunch, and parents need time to take a shower.

In
situations like that, it is the adult’s job to make the technology time
more valuable and interactive by asking questions and connecting a
child’s virtual experience on the screen with real-life experiences in
her world.

Learning with Technology at Home

Whether you’re giving your child your smart screen phone to
entertain them, or it’s your toddlers’ preferred playtime is on an iPad
or tablet, here are eight ways to make sure your child’s experiences
with technology are educational and fun.

Focus on Active Engagement

Any
time your child is engaged with a screen, stop a program, or mute the
commercials, and ask engaging questions. What was that character
thinking? Why did the main character do that? What would you have done
in that situation?

Allow for Repetition DVDs and YouTube videos
add an essential ingredient for young minds which is repetition. Let
your young child to watch the same video over and over, and ask him what
he noticed after each viewing.

Make it Tactile Unlike computers
that require a mouse to manipulate objects on the screen, iPads, tablets
and smartphones allow kids manipulate “physical” objects with their
fingers.

Practice Problem Solving An emerging category of games
will force your child to solve problems as they play, potentially
building concentration and analytical skills in the process; although
the jury is still out on this. There is no clinical data that supports
the marketing message of app makers.

Encourage Creation Use
technology for creation, not just entertainment. Have your child record a
story on your iPod, or sing a song into your video game system. Then,
create an entirely new sound using the playback options, slow down and
speed up their voice and add different backgrounds and beats until
they’ve created something uniquely theirs.

Show Him How to Use It
Many computer games have different levels and young children may not
know how to move up or change levels. If your child is stuck on one
level that’s become too easy, ask if he knows how to move up and help
him if he wants more of a challenge.

Ask Why If your child is
using an app or game the “wrong” way, always pressing the incorrect
button, for example, ask them why. It may be that they like hearing the
noise the game makes when they get the question wrong, or they might be
stuck and can’t figure out which group of objects match number four.

Focus
on Play Young kids should be exploring and playing with technology.
This should be considered play, and not a focus on drilling skills.

Ask
For Your Own Log-In Often, school programs come with a parent log-in
that will allow you to see your child’s progress. If it doesn’t, ask to
see the reports that a teacher has access to. Then, check his progress
every few weeks. It’s a great way for you and your child to be on the
same page about their progress.

Ask About Teacher Training
Technology is often implemented in classrooms without appropriate
professional development. If your child’s classroom is using a
whole-class system, such as Clickers or an Interactive Smartboard, ask
how it’s used in class and what training the teacher has had. “As a
parent, you want to know if teachers feel well trained and they’re
putting [new technologies] to good use.

Find Parent Resources One of the best ways that technology can help your child is by helping you learn more about learning.

Computers,
smartphones, and tablets aren’t going away, but with a few tweaks and
consideration, you can make your child’s technology-time productive,
educational, and fun!

Let’s be honest. Most children can use a
mouse, open and close apps, and even search the internet by the time
they are three years old.

Once they have the cognitive ability, it’s time to talk with your child about internet safety.

Set
clear guidelines and internet safety rules about what types of media
are acceptable and carefully support and monitor your child’s technology
use.

Tell your child to never share her name, address, or personal information online or on social media.

Talk
with your child about what to do if he comes across inappropriate
content (close the screen and alert you), and make sure you have a
high-quality web filter and security system in place.

Wrapping it Up
Help your child understand that technology is only one of many tools for learning. Download educational games, read books, and do research. When your child asks a question, do an internet search to find the answer.

Information to Consider When Buying Laptop

If you are an online student, you may have
a small income every month. Therefore, you cannot get a
high-end laptop. So, what you need to do is buy a laptop
based on your budget and still meet your needs. In this
article, I will provide some tips that can be used to buy the best laptop for
your online college class.

Great Processor – Just like a desktop computer, the processor or CPU is
the brain of the laptop. If you start, you can check the Intel Core i7 CPU.
However, if you can spend a little more, you can get something better. For
example, if your budget is more than $ 750, you can get the best generation of
processors.

SSD Storage – If you are familiar with
SSDs, you surely know how fast they are, especially when compared to HDDs.
Also, they offer a higher level of reliability. Especially, SSD is the latest technology. This
device consumes less energy and doesn’t heat up quickly. So,
if you want to keep your computer cool, you might want to buy a laptop that is
equipped with an SSD.

RAM – For best efficiency, you need to
have plenty of RAM and SSD storage along with a fast processor. At least your laptop or computer must have at least 8 GB of memory.
This is important if you want to keep your machine working
quickly. If you are a computer science student, photographer or
architect, you must have at least 16 GB of RAM.

Battery Life – All you need to do is get a laptop that can give you at
least 3 hours of backup time. Three hours will be more than enough if you want
to attend online classes or watch recorded lectures many times.

In conclusion, these are some tips you can consider when buying a laptop
for your online class. Make sure you consider all of these features when
looking for the best laptop to meet your needs. If you need more information
then you can work with a computer expert.